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1984 Essay

775 words - 4 pages

Many governments use some form of mind control over their citizens. Governments use mind control in different ways to secure the loyalty of their citizens and to greaten their own power over them. Governments do these things by spying on their citizens, imposing quotas, and hiding the truth from them.One form of mind control used by governments is spying. In "Spycraft and Soulcraft" the German government kept extensive records of their citizen's lives, especially of those who spoke out against the government. One woman, Vera Wollenberger, found out that the government had been keeping extensive files on her lifestyle and activities. What was most alarming was that she discovered that her ...view middle of the document...

(Orwell, 1984, pg. ) Winston has to throw this picture down the memory hole before the telescreen could catch him with it and persecute him. The government has destroyed those people making them unpersons so they never existed. This relates to Garrisons comparison of the Ministry of Truth to the U.S. government treatment of the Kennedy assassination. Although the government knows that Lee Harvey Oswald could not have killed the President because the way the bullets hit Kennedy and where Oswald was positioned it would have been impossible for the bullets to hit him the way they did, which means there must have been another killer. (Garrison, With Liberty an Justice for All, pg.2) The U.S. government also has locked away a lot of the evidence from the Kennedy assassination so that the public would never know the real truth only the one that the government has given them. This shows the lack of trust the government has in its people. It also shows that the government is trying to hide something from their people the one's who elected these government officials. So much for Democracy? Many governments, past and present,...

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