This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Analysis Of Thomas Hobbes' "Laws Of Nature" In Comparison To Benjamin Constant's Essay "The Liberty Of The Ancients Compared To That Of The Moderns."

815 words - 4 pages

The thesis of this paper is that Thomas Hobbes' first three "Laws of Nature" explain the evolution of cooperation in a state of nature, and are a prime example of how the modern state can protect an individual. Hobbes' view is that in a state of nature, where there is no system of government or ruling authority, individuals would join into a social contract to protect their peace and security. His first three "Laws of Nature" are what people will seek out before entering that social contract (Hobbes, 71).His first law is divided into two parts or as he calls them, "branches." The first law is "to seek peace" (Hobbes, 71). The most important thing to an individual is to be protected; ...view middle of the document...

People have come to recognize liberty as a completely different set of values and principles (Constant, 1). In modern times, liberty is the right to make your own decisions, and accept the consequences; as well as the right to select their own level of participation in government. Liberty of the ancient times, however, was collectively and directly to control government. (Constant, 2)Similarly, the definitions of Hobbes' values and his laws have changed. Still today we seek out the same principles that he highlighted as important. The principles themselves, however, are not the same. The peace Hobbes spoke of was peace from oppression and from a monarchy or emperor. The peace we seek today is in the form of freedom: the freedom to make our own choices and to be individuals. That is our peace.Because of this different definition of peace, Hobbes' views on laws can be clearly seen in our own laws in the United States. The laws of nature are present in our own bill of rights. The peace and security of Hobbes is in our second amendment, "the security of a free state." These words describe the freedom, the peace of Hobbes' day.The Bill of Rights, and the Constitution in general, is the supreme power of our nation. We...

Other Essays On Analysis Of Thomas Hobbes' "Laws Of Nature" In Comparison To Benjamin Constant's Essay "The Liberty Of The Ancients Compared To That Of The Moderns."

A Comparison Of Canada's Branch Banking System To The Unit Banking System Of The United States

2976 words - 12 pages technology, what NAFTA has done and how it has influenced theNorth American banking systems, how the government controls the banking industry of theirrespective countries. And finally a comparison of a unit banking system to a branch bankingsystem. This essay will assess the pros and cons of the Canadian banking system and comparedto the pros and cons American banking system.In Canada, the different types of banks are currently categorized under a

"Guilty Pleasures" By Laurell K. Hamilton As Compared To The Buffy The Vampire Slayer Tv Show. Includes Synopsis Of The Book

3119 words - 13 pages pick up Catherine and Monica, since she was their designated driver for the night. The vampire on the stage when Anita goes in to get them is Aubrey, who tries to enthrall Anita and almost succeeds. Aubrey hates it when fight him. He attacks Anita in the middle of the club and Jean-Claude has to step in to prevent them from killing each other. Jean-Claude ushers them offstage, revealing that the bachelorette party was just a ploy to get Anita

Three Main Events That Caused The Escalation Of The Cold War Up To The Berlin Blockade

933 words - 4 pages I believe that there were three main events that caused the escalation of the Cold War. This essay is going to assess how these three events contributed to the escalation of the Cold War and how important they were to its continuation.In my opinion the first strains in the relation between the two sides started at Potsdam more then at Yalta. When we look at Yalta we only see agreements such as "Hold free elections in Soviet occupied territory

Walker's Essay Seems To Suggest That We Live To Discover The Symbolism Of Life And Unravel It's Complexities By Actively Seeking Them Out

1786 words - 8 pages Walker Percy's essay, "The Loss of Creature" maintains that we should "recover the creature" and learn to "extract the thing from the package." However, we can never exclusively recover the creature from the "symbolic package," for we are in a process of continuous discovery throughout our lives and we must see the symbolic complex for more than it appears to be. Percy's methods of perceiving the world are in fact impossible to put into effect

Religions Of Ancient Egypt Compared To Todays Chrisianity

638 words - 3 pages the after life. In the story of Osiris, the dead went to the Other World; however, once in the Other World it was possible to be resurrected back to life. The idea of an afterlife is much different from that of Christianity. Christians believe in a more permanent death than ancient Egypt. Once dead, a person is sent for eternity into either Heaven or Hell, depending on their actions in life. In Egypt, all people went to the Other World after death

The Study Of History Has Value Only To The Extent That It Is Relevant To Our Daily Lives

1146 words - 5 pages Untitled Before remarking on the topic above, I would like to make clear the value of the study of history. For my part, history of human being is like a treasury which people could recourse to in all ages. Hence, I partly agree with the statement. In my opinion, the study of history has much value to the extent that it is relevant to our daily lives. However, in certain cases the study of history would of no use even if it has

A Comparison Between The Three Movements From Vivaldi's L'estro Armonica, Op.III. Used For Advanced Higher. Would Be Usefull To Have A Copy Of The Score To Accompany This Essay

1416 words - 6 pages modulates the second time, and again the third and finally back to the starting key, A minor on the fourth occurrence.Another similarity of all the pieces is that they remain at a constant tempo, with no accelerandos or rallentandos which add to the stately feel of the first movement, haunting, nostalgic mood to the second and urgent feel to the third. However all finish with a pause and are played with a slight rallentando, which is not marked in the

Lord Of The Flies: The Nature Of Governments

1323 words - 6 pages Lord of the Flies: the Nature of GovernmentsMany governments currently exist in the world, but none of them are absolutely perfect. Natural governments are created to unite a group of people, and to serve them respect, dignity, and safety. No government is perfect, simply because people are not all perfect. The flaws of society are depicted in the book, Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The natural government was assembled first by

Extended Definition Of Death And The Benifits To Society That Are Not Commonly Discussed

1115 words - 5 pages A New BeginningThere are several words that are percepted in many different ways. Death is certainly one of those words. To most people, death is the single most disturbing event that can happen in human society. When a person diesmany awful emotions are invoked in their family, friends and sometimes even strangers. The fact that death can occur at any time and in thousands of ways makes it completely unpredictable. One moment a person could be

Comparing The Methods And Effects Of The Poems 'Tall Nettles" By Edward Thomas And "Two Look At Two" By Robert Frost Concerning The Relationships Between Man And Nature

803 words - 4 pages survive - the refreshing rain 'springs' which gives the sense of purifying; only helps nature to grow, and at the same time corrodes man-made things. Not only does the poet consider nettles (nature) to be above unnatural things, but also he deems nettles to be tall and majestic as the trees 'only the elm butt tops the nettles now'. Also in the title he describes this weed as 'tall', meaning that the nettles are comparable to the trees in their

Romanticism & Eugene Delacroix: Also A Look At The Death Of Sardanapalus And Liberty Leading The People

1138 words - 5 pages bodies scattered at their feet. Delacroix incorporated himself in this political painting as the man in the top hat to the left of Liberty. Delacroix was said to have known the young boy holding the pistols to the right of Liberty. Apparently, the boy killed a royal soldier before being badly wounded himself.In 1832, Delacroix made a trip to Morocco that would forever change the subjects of his paintings. He became fascinated by the life and customs

Similar Papers

Compare And Contrast The Views Of Thomas Hobbes And John Locke

737 words - 3 pages Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) and John Locke (1632-1704) greatly disagreed on many key issues of their day; issues such as human nature, political authority, and the right of people to rebel. Hobbes studied before the Enlightenment, whereas that influenced John Locke's views immensely. Hobbes's ideas are also derived from his pessimistic view of human nature. He viewed people as selfish and greedy. To the contrary, Locke viewed people as good and

A Incite Into The Pressures Of Life As A Teenager. As Compared To The Simplistic Existance Of A Fly

971 words - 4 pages I watch the fly, performing aerial acrobatics, flying carelessly, looping and turning in the air. Then SPLAT! The tiny insect ceases to exist, slaughtered by the tight grasp of my hands clamped together in feelings of hatred. I envy the life of that fly. So simple, so carefree. No emotions, no expectations, no rules.That fly did not have to encounter numerous hurdles in her life, she was born as a maggot, evolved into a fly, and then in a brief

The Amalgamation Of Science And Technology: An Essay About The Factors And Events That Lead To The Development Of Science From The Greek Period To The Scientific Revolution

4258 words - 18 pages natural phenomena we see around us are explicable in terms of matter interacting by natural laws, and are not the results of arbitrary acts by gods4.An essential part of the Milesians' success in developing a picture of nature was that they engaged in open, rational, critical debate about each other's ideas. It was understood that all the theories and explanations were directly competitive with one another, and all should be open to public scrutiny

This Essay Compares And Contrasts The Political Philosophy Of Hobbes And Locke

5669 words - 23 pages Grotius (1583-1645). According to Grotius, all particular moral principles derive from immutable principles of reason. Since these moral mandates are fixed in nature, they are thus called "laws of nature." By using the terminology of the natural law theory, Hobbes is suggesting that, from human self-interest and social agreement alone, one can derive the same kinds of laws, which Grotius believes are immutably fixed in nature (2). Throughout his