This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Anglo Saxon Values In Beowulf Essay

399 words - 2 pages

The folk epic Beowulf reflects many Anglo-Saxon values. The Anglo-Saxon epic stresses the physical world, fairness, boasting, love of glory, belief in wyrd, deep sense of loyalty to the tribe and the tribal leader, and the importance of generosity and bravery.The Anglo-Saxon value of fairness is reflected by Beowulf. He asks Hrothgar the favor of fighting alone with Grendel with only the help of his men, as stated in this line, "That this one favor you should not refuse me-that I, alone and with the help ...view middle of the document...

Beowulf boasts a lot to Hrothgar about all his successes. He brags about his strength and valor. He describes many treacherous journeys in which he killed many of his enemies, drove five great giants into chains, swam in the blackness of night, hunting monsters out of the ocean, and killing them one by one. This boasting is important because it assists Hrothgar in believing that Beowulf is the right man to defeat Grendel. While Beowulf boasts about is great strength, he is also loyal to the king, reflecting another Anglo-Saxon value of being lenient to the lord.Hrothgar demonstrates the Anglo-Saxon value of love of glory in the poem. When Hrothgar leads the Danes to glory, he decides to build a hall that would hold his mighty band. And in that hall he would divide the spoils of their victories to his comrades and kinsmen. He fulfills his promise naming the mead hall Herot and commending a banquet.Many of the Anglo-Saxon values expressed in Beowulf revolve around boasting, loyalty, strength and fairness. The comprising of these qualities makes Beowulf the hero, and Beowulf an excellent literary work of Anglo-Saxon history.

Other Essays On Anglo-Saxon Values in Beowulf

19th Century European Imperialism Data Based Essay; Identify And Explain The Political, Economic, And Social Causes Of European Imperialism In The 19th Century

406 words - 2 pages express Caucasian superiority and how other races are meant to only serve the white man, not to ever be his equal. Document five suggests that the social "survival of the fittest" is the scientific justification for imperialism. All three documents, nevertheless, look down upon any and all races that are not remotely related to the Anglo-Saxon race.Essay adapted from the following source: Noonan, Teresa C., "New Imperialism: Cuases." Document-Based Assessment Activities for Global History Classes. Portland, Maine: J. Weston Walch, 1999.

English Colonies In New England Essay

419 words - 2 pages English, Anglo-Saxon culture, succeeded in becoming the overarching influence in the development of the basic institutions of American life.It all started at Jamestown, as we have already seen. From the seed of Jamestown, planted on the edge of Chesapeake Bay, the Virginia colony would grow. Here a whole new way of life took form, based on plantation farming and the employment of slave labor. It came to be known as the "Southern" way of

Shakespeare And Insanity

3340 words - 14 pages from sheep's milk), hen and goose eggs. Wild berries would be a delicacy in the Anglo-Saxon diet although they would have to be in season. The lack of refrigeration would lead to a diet deficient in Vitamin C for much of the year, especially during the winter when meals largely made up of salted meat would lead to symptoms of scurvy. A lack of Vitamin A and niacin undoubtedly led to common skin and eye problems, and smoky living conditions

Untitled

2000 words - 8 pages . "English can be traced back as far as the early 1100's B.C." "The Anglo-Saxons in England spread their language as many different enemies tried to take over England, but failed. They would force their prisoners to learn their language, and inter-grade themselves into society." The language grew even more steadily as the criminals of England were being sailed all the way around the world to Australia. The criminals would be dropped off

Mafia

2008 words - 9 pages -Sicilian's were not alone in immigrating to the United States. The Germans, Irish, and European Jews also came in great waves, running from hunger and religious persecution. They not only had trouble adjusting to the other ethnic groups, but with accepting America's Puritan Ethic. It was based upon WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant), therefore the accumulation of wealth being seen as proof of God's favor and evidence of a moral life. Many people took

Stratford And Tourism

6245 words - 25 pages year from hundreds of different countries.Stratford is over 800 years old, with Anglo-Saxon origins. It was most likely chosen as a settlement due to its proximity with the River Avon, which could provide water for cleaning, washing ad drinking. It did not develop into a market town until the medieval period.Shakespeare grew up in Stratford during the 16th century and spent most of his life in the town. After Shakespeare's death in the early 17th

Hansel88@Excite.Com

2674 words - 11 pages public opinion. They did this by using 100 percent Americanism propaganda. Ethnic differences were minimized by telling people what American was, leaning towards British qualities, and what American was not, leaning towards German qualities. In the 1920s, like Sandel¡¯s article points out the British Anglo culture was the right one. Immigration legislation was aimed at Eastern Europeans coming to America. They wanted the Italians to go

Character In "The Yellow Wallpaper" By Charlotte Perkins Gilman

1587 words - 7 pages The short story 'The Yellow Wall-Paper' written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is a cry for freedom. This story is about a woman who fights for her right to express what she feels, and fights for her right to do what she wants to do. The narrator in this short story is a woman whose husband loves her very much, but oppresses her to the point where she cannot take it anymore. This story revolves around the main character, her oppressed life, and her

Edgar Allen Poe's View Of Death In "The Fall Of The House Of Usher"

1836 words - 8 pages Edgar Allen Poe's Symbolism of Death in 'The Fall of the House of Usher'Death is defined as, 'The termination or extinction of something' (American Heritage Dictionary). Edgar Allen Poe uses this description in 'The Fall of the House of Usher' in different ways. Poe's intention when writing 'The Fall of the House of Usher' was not to present a moral, lesson, or truth to the reader; he was simply trying to bring forth a sense of terror to the

"Slaughterhouse Five" By Vonnegut

2264 words - 10 pages When one begins to analyze a military novel it is important to first look at the historical context in which the book was written. On the nights of February 13-14 in 1944 the city of Dresden, Germany was subjected to one of the worst air attacks in the history of man. By the end of the bombing 135,000 to 250,000 people had been killed by the combined forces of the United States and the United Kingdom. Dresden was different then Berlin or many of

Psychoanalysis And Freud

2420 words - 10 pages unconscious and containing all the instincts and everything that was repressed into it; and (3) the superego, the conscious that harbors the values, ideals, and prohibitions that set the guidelines for the ego and that punishes through the imposition of guilt feelings.Strong boundaries between the three parts keep the ego fairly free from disturbing thoughts and wishes in the id, thereby guaranteeing efficient functioning and socially acceptable behavior

Similar Papers

Describes Beowulf As An Epic Hero Through His Anglo Saxon Qualities He Posesses

449 words - 2 pages Qualities of an Epic HeroThe poem "Beowulf", of an unknown author, is set in the Anglo-Saxon Period, which starts in 449 and ends in 1485. In 449 the Germanic tribes, Angles, Saxons, and Jutes invade England. In 1485, Ending the Anglo-Saxon period was the Norman invasion. This poem is set in Scandinavia between the sixth and seventh century. The three tribes in this poem are Geats, Danes, and Swedes. An epic hero, such as Beowulf, possess

Works Representing Anglo Saxon People And Their Society; Works Included As I.E.'s: Beowulf, A History Of The English Church And People And Seafarer

478 words - 2 pages Society of a Different TimeMany works of Literature represent people and their society of that era. Beowulf, A History of the English Church and People and Seafarer does this by representing Anglo-Saxon people and their society.One quality in this era that seems to be respected by society is fearing God and showing respect for him. In Beowulf, Grendel shows respect to God. "Though he lived In Herot, when the night hid him, He never Dared to

Beowulf Essay

1242 words - 5 pages Beowulf - A Hero Beowulf is an epic poem about a man and some of his adventures. Beowulf, the main character, is the hero of the story. He possesses many traits that cause him to be not only an epic hero, but a tragic one, too. The traits that many heroes in literature have are: # A hero's conception is often unusual, and by tradition his mother is a virgin. # Usually there is a plot to kill him immediately after his birth. # Although

John Galsworthy Essay

1124 words - 5 pages , Irene, did not love him. He just could not imagine that to be loved one should also give this love. But Soames looked at Irene as a part of his property and this had never occurred to him that Irene was "one of those women- not to common in the Anglo-Saxon race- born to be loved and to love, who when not loving are not living"4!Another point I would like to make is about how the author shows us what works of art mean to Soames and, as a comparison to