Attributes Of The American Scholar By Emerson

929 words - 4 pages

How do you know? How did you learn what you know? Emerson portrays the American scholar as a person who learns from three sources. These sources by which a scholar is educated are nature, books and action. According to Ralph Waldo Emerson, the American scholar is one whose character is split into many facets.Nature has the most influence on the mind because it is the only resource that is everywhere. In it's natural form or altered by man everything is nature. Nature is like a circle with no beginning and no ending; "Everyday, the sun; and, after sunset, night and her stars. Ever the wind blows; ever the grass grows." Its presence is always available to anyone; through sight, smell, sou ...view middle of the document...

The scholar takes this classification a step further; seeing nature and all it's levels of classification as visual representation of the thoughts in our mind. Nature is a direct reflection of the human mind. When a person looks into a mirror they see their physical reflection of themselves. When a scholar looks at classified nature they see a reflection of their mind. Human intellect depends upon the intrinsic intelligibility of reality. Physical laws and processes, energy flows, biological ecosystems, the human body, society, language--the world at large is one of inexhaustible potential meaning. That infinite repository of system and order is evident to anyone who walks on a beach, stares at the stars, watches insects, and climbs a tree. Without the order in nature to stimulate and reward the activity of the mind, thinking would proceed in futile circles, significance would remain elusive, facts and things would remain discreet, fragmented, and random. Instead, because of the intelligibility of nature, says Emerson, "the ambitious soul sits down before each refractory fact; one after another reduces all strange constitutions, all new powers, to their class and their law and goes on forever to animate the last fiber of organization, the outskirts of nature, by insight."The third source of learning is the Past; human history and culture as it is preserved and conveyed in various artifacts, but primarily in books. In books one finds dead fact transmuted into quick thought, perishable life transmuted into durable truth. Books process the world through the mind of one thinker and make it more accessible to others. To th...

RELATED

This Essay Has Quotes And Points Of View From The Books Thoreau And Emerson

919 words - 4 pages by readers. They await the time to inspire and influence the youth to greater careers. It has long been said that reading is the essential truth to life by many great writes such as Emerson and Thoreau. Not only do they speak about reading but they emphasize on the ability of taking action. Knowledge is not power unless it is used in action. To succeed in today's modern world, you need to understand the way reality works. Books provide hidden

Pygmalion and the power of love - Emerson and Brit Lit - Research Paper

1274 words - 6 pages Respect and Admiration: A Foundation for Love Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw, is a portrayal of two people who are unable to develop a deep affection for each other. Shaw uses relationships between a few characters to convince the reader that respect is the foundation for love. The rude interactions between Professor Higgins and Eliza (during their time together) does not evolve into a passionate love story between the two main characters

Assess The Roles Played By Science And Technology In The Construction Of C19th And/Or C20th American Urban Space?

1894 words - 8 pages , pharmacy and theatre improved American lives in a dramatic way, but not without a few negative side effects.One of the first major inventions to become a national craze was the automobile. First developed with a combustion engine in 1896 by inventor Henry Ford, he later started the Ford Motor Company, which mass produced affordable automobiles known as the Model-T. Ford's Model-Ts became such an overwhelming success that he sold over 15 million Model-Ts

The American Hunger: An Analysis Of "Hunger" As Used By Richard Wright In His Book, Black Boy

1570 words - 7 pages The American Hunger“A hungry man is not a free man.” - Adlai E. Stevenson“Men can starve from a lack of self realization as much as they can from a lack of bread.” - Richard WrightThe life and story of Richard Wright is one of heartbreaking defeats and powerful victories. Growing up a poor black boy in the South, Richard Wright lived a life that was all too familiar to those in his situation at that time in history, a life of

The Developing Infrastructure of American Literature - KSU American Literature - Essay

569 words - 3 pages Hernandez 1 Kim Hernandez English 102 Composition II Instructor: Dr. Sarah Anne Shope Essay #1 May 29, 2017 “Deportation at Breakfast” Deciding on what story to pick was not hard. The one that stood out to me the most was “Deportation at Breakfast”. It stood out to me because of the word deportation. What could that mean? Was there someone in the story that was going to be deported? I wanted to find out so I decided to read this short story. The

The Age Of Romanticism In American Literature

364 words - 2 pages The Age of Romanticism was a short yet meaningful period in American literature. American literature developed in dramatic ways during this age. Moving away from their European roots American writers started composing more and more articles unique to American culture. For the next two decades, American writers such as Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, produced scores of

Daisy Miller, by Henry James: (I) To what extent is Daisy Miller's character a reflection of the American character? (II) Was Henry James' ending artistically necessary?

495 words - 2 pages Daisy Miller, ubiquitous flirt, cavorts around with mysterious Italian romantics and remains contemptuous and ignorant of European social customs during her short stay in the Old World. On an intimate level, Daisy's story is one about a young woman's hedonistic adventures in a world where hedonism has no place. Daisy's self-indulgent, pleasure-seeking lifestyle is typical of the American capitalist world, and her untimely death is a literary and

The survey of American education - bellevue - Assignment

411 words - 2 pages The Survey Assignment about American Education Jason Wu 21162543 For many Americans, education is the most important thing in the United States right now because it provide a lot of talent. But there are still many problems with education in the United States. Therefore, in order to effectively understand these problems, we conducted this questionnaire and made a report. Our research topic is education in the United States, so our main

Essay About The American Short Story "Scary Movies" Published In 1995 Written By Steven Amidon

690 words - 3 pages Scary MoviesAn American short story published in 1995 written by Steven Amidon.There have always been racial problems in America, which is no wonder since the Americans took black people as slaves a long time ago. However, in the beginning of the 20th century the process of solving the racial issues in America begun. Nevertheless, it was a very difficult process, which really has not come to an end yet.The story takes place in a suburb of New

The Issues Involved In The End Of The American Frontier

1868 words - 8 pages for the present day. In "The Significance of theFrontier in American History" written in 1893 by Frederick Jackson Turner several pointsare called upon to show the existence of this frontier was discontinued.The first of these points was that in the time of 1890, there was no longer afrontier line. He argues this point by stating that the unsettled lands beyond the so-called"frontier-line" has so many areas of settlement that there can no longer

What were the consequences and effects of the American Dream? - American Literature - Essay

1185 words - 5 pages Shil​ ​1 Nidhi​ ​Shil Ms​ ​Thomas American​ ​Literature 6th​ ​October​ ​2017 The​ ​American​ ​Nightmare The​ ​novel​ ​​The​ ​Great​ ​Gatsby​​ ​written​ ​by​ ​F.​ ​Scott​ ​Fitzgerald​ ​appears​ ​to​ ​be​ ​about​ ​a​ ​tragic love​ ​story​ ​set​ ​in​ ​the​ ​1920’s​ ​which​ ​was​ ​the​ ​prime​ ​period​ ​of​ ​the​ ​American​ ​dream.​ ​However​ ​the expectations​ ​of​ ​the​ ​American​ ​dream​ ​were​ ​deeply​ ​deceiving​ ​and​ ​those​ ​who​ ​got

What were the consequences of the Spanish American War?

583 words - 3 pages The United States of the 19th century and the United States of the 20th century differ a great deal. In most of the 19th century, the US was isolationist and did not get involved much in the affairs of the world. However, by the start of the 20th century, the US began to get involved a greater amount in world affairs. The Spanish-American War (1898) established the United States as a world power and caused the US to follow the path of

The Unjustifiable Use of the Atomic Bomb - American history - essay

1389 words - 6 pages On December 7th, 1941 Japan initiated a surprise attack on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii, with the intent of aggravating America to fight in World War II. The effects of the attacks were devastating. It resulted in the death of approximately 2,400 Americans, 21 sunken ships, and 188 aircrafts being destroyed. Four years after the attack on Pearl Harbour, the United States of America counterattacked by dropping an

The Importance of the American Vote - English - Essay

784 words - 4 pages Daily 1 Jaden Daily Celia Winchester English 121 23 September 2018 Importance of the American Vote In the article by Ann DeLaney, “Should You Register to Vote,” the author explains why she believes that everyone who is eligible to vote should do so, especially since “political decisions will made for [those who vote, and for those who chose not to] even if [citizens] elect not to participate” (DeLaney 12). Those who chose to vote have an

Of Mice and Men and the American Dream - English - essay

1309 words - 6 pages The American dream was an appealing idea to the millions of very poor people living in America in the 1930s. Even though it’s been decades since, people still aim to achieve this goal. Many people believed that the United States was the land of opportunities and that is how the american dream became an inspiration for many in hope for a better life. In the novel “ of mice and men,” by John Steinbeck, illustrates the harsh reality of the american