Eerything Needed About The Articles Of Confederation, The Federalist, Anti Federalist, The Elastic Clause, Federalism, Delegated, Express, Reserved, And Concurrent Powers

784 words - 4 pages

1. Articles of confederationIn Philadelphia, 1787 the articles of confederation where revised by 55 delegates. They agree that they needed to write a new constitution, that they where in need of a strong government, that there should be an executive branch (president), and that the states should not be as powerful as a national government. But they also had some disagreements like how many representatives should each state have in congress, how should the slave population count, and how to elect the president and for how long. The compromises they made where "The Great Compromise" that was to create a congress compose of 2 houses: The house of representatives, that was based in population, ...view middle of the document...

The Judicial branch can limit the president by declaring his actions unconstitutional.5. 3 ways the president limits the power of congressThe president can vito, it can recommend legislation to congress and it can appeal to the people.6. 3 ways the power of the judicial branch is limited by the presidentThe president appoints member to the government, he also can appoint judges and pardon people.7.Elastic clauseThe elastic clause is under article 1, section 8, clause 18 on the constitution. It says that congress can do what is necessary and proper for the well being of the nation, this is where the implied powers of congress come from, and because of this the power of congress can be extended.8. FederalismIn federalism the constitution requires the government to "guarantee to every state in this union a republican form of government". The national government must "protect each of the states against invasion or domestic violence", the national government is also bound to respect the territorial integrity of each of the states, congress must...

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