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Essay: What Clothing And What Sports Did The Ancient Romans Have?

309 words - 2 pages

ClothingAncient Rome women wore loose tunics. The main garment is an ankle length stola tied at the waist below their breast. A brooch at the shoulder fastened the stola. Over it, a rectangle cloth usually dropped over one shoulder, around back. They usually wore sandals. At home they wore elegant slippers. Women who could not afford shoes went barefoot. The material that ...view middle of the document...

Poor women were fashioned with course brown and grey cloth. In the cold weather women wore crapes, shawls and scarfs. Also they wore woolen socks, stockings, and probably mittens. British women wore a Gallic coat which is a wide loose tunic with sleeves.SportsIn the city Rome there is a place called campus. It is an old drill ground for soldiers. It is a large section of plain near the Tiber River. Overtime campus became Rome's track and field playground. Even famous people such as Caesar and Augustus exercised in campus. People might jump in the Tiber River to have a swim or wander of and relax by taking a bath. Men practice riding, fencing, wrestling, throwing, swimming, hunting and fishing. At home men play ball before they have dinner. A popular ball game is to throw the ball as high as possible and catch it before it hit the ground. Women didn't join these games. Romans played many ball games, but not all of them had specific names. Some of them were difficult. Only a few games that could be formulated with a ball and a circle.

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