Fibonacci Numbers In Flowers Essay

583 words - 3 pages

Fibonacci Series of numbers can be explained as rows of number with the numbers in the row equaling the last number in the row. "The Fibonacci sequence, can be generated by the rule f1 = f2 = 1, FN+1 = FN + fn-1." (http://www.world-mysteries.com/sci_17.htm#top) . This pattern is well known in the fields of math and science, but what is really amazing is its pattern within nature. The Fibonacci number sequence could be called one of the principal "laws of nature." (http://www.world-mysteries.com/sci_17.htm#top) The Fibonacci Series of numbers can also be seen in Nature. Everything from flowers to rabbit breading, to the human head and hand can be related to the Fibonacci numbers. Although plants may not known ab ...view middle of the document...

That is why the spirals are imperfect. The plant is responding to physical constraints, not to a mathematical rule." (http://www.world-mysteries.com/sci_17.htm#top). If a flower is examined closely enough you can see the arrangement of petals on a flower. f we were to do so, we would find that the number of petals on a flower, that still has all of its petals intact and has not lost any, for many flowers is a Fibonacci number:3 petals: lily, iris5 petals: buttercup, wild rose, larkspur, columbine (aquilegia)8 petals: delphiniums13 petals: ragwort, corn marigold, cineraria,21 petals: aster, black-eyed Susan, chicory34 petals: plantain, pyrethrumFibonacci numbers can also be seen in the arrangement of seeds on flower heads. "In the figure below you can see that the orange "petals" seem to form spirals curving both to the left and to the right. At the edge of the picture, if you count those spiraling to the right as you go outwards, there are 55 spirals. A little further towards the centre and you can count 34 spirals." (Knott). This same pattern is repeated throughout nature in seeds and flower heads.Figure 1: Coneflowerhttp://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibnat.html#petalI find in quite interesting that so many patterns can come from a simple sequence of numbers. I don't think looking at a flower will be the same old flower anymore. I would have thought that only nature could have an answer to why flowers are shaped they way there are, but here Fibonacci has explained one way in how flowers are created.SourcesKnott, Robert. Fibonacci Numbers and Nature. http://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibnat.htmlScientific Mysteries: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature.http://www.world-mysteries.com/sci_17.htm

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