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Impacts And Consequences Of The Industrial Revolution On Society

616 words - 3 pages

Impacts and Consequences of the Industrial Revolution on Society (1700-1830) The initial stage of the Industrial Revolution took place in England from 1712-1830 and can be best described as, "the application of power driven machinery to manufacturing". It was brought about primarily by the invention of the steam engine and the developments of new technology for the textiles industry.Prior to the advent of machinery Britain was primarily an agriculturally based country, most people worked on there own farms or as hands on nearby farms. The advent of industry saw many rural people moving to cities such as Liverpool and Manchester, for employment in the new factories. There were an abundance of jobs for the now exploding population. With this however came appalling working and living conditions, low wages and long hours.As urbanisation ...view middle of the document...

The new working conditions brought the people of the working classes together. Where as before they had perhaps been working in smaller social groups on farms, they had now been herded together with others similar to themselves. This new interaction, it is believed, led to a fellowship amongst the workers giving them a class identity. This class consciousness coupled with the development in new trade unions for the factory workers, were to see the working classes taken more seriously from a political point of view.The revolution had a powerful effect on the British economy. Using the readily available trade routes of the British Colonies, Britain was faced with an almost captive market with whom to trade the readily available goods. Also, what would once have been considered a luxury, such as hand woven or painted items could now be brought by the lower class consumers due to decline in costs via mass production.During the early developments of factories there were no government legislations as to the running or conditions of the work place. No laws protected the workers, if someone was injured and unable to work they lost their job. The trade unions were set to keep the government on their guard. Britain was keen to avoid a social revolution as had been seen previously in France. The government, although arguably not doing enough for the workers was able to do enough to quell any possibilities of a civil uprising which would hamper the industrial development of the country.In conclusion I believe that the industrial revolution was a significant benefit to Britain as a whole. The industrial and social developments combined with the governments ability to avoid social confrontations has led to the Britain, if not the modern world we live in. If we look at the countries today that have yet to undergo industrialisation, such as parts of Africa, perhaps we can best appreciate the beneficial consequences it has had on our society.No. Of Words = 546

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