Poetic Genre Conventions, Techniques And Idiom. Tcd Literature Essay

1425 words - 6 pages

Write an essay analysing three contrasting examples of one poetic genre, paying close attention to conventions, techniques and idiom.
The Ballad is a poetic genre usually used to convey a particular narrative. It is one of the oldest poetic forms in English poetry, originating in the medieval times. However, a revival of the form occurred during the 19th century which is also known as the “romantic period”. A poet would consider this form of poetry when trying to convey a story or to raise an ethical or political issue for the reader to ponder. Originally, this form of poetry was meant to be set to music, meaning the poetry in this genre oftentimes contains a musical quality. In strict ballads, the poem contains alternate lines of four and three beats in stanzas of four or “Quatrains”. However, because a ballad is more concerned with the oral aspect of poetry, ballads lack the formal consistency as some other poetic forms. To further explore the ballad as a poetic genre, this essay will examine and analyse three different poems, written by different poets and differing themes. The poems referenced are John Keats’ ‘La Belle Dame Sans Merci. A Ballad’, Amy Levy’s ‘A Ballade of Religion and Marriage’ and Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Ballade of Reading Gaol’.
John Keats poem; ‘La Belle Dame Sans Merci. A Ballad’ tells the tale of a knight who fell in love with a beautiful woman, “a faery’s child” who seemed to reciprocate his love but left him alone on a “cold hill’s side” . This narrative style is typical of a ballad. It also includes themes of the supernatural, unrequited love, tricks/jests, chivalric characters and beautiful women which are all also typical characteristics of the ballad. The poem contains 12 quatrains, each with alternating lines of iambic tetrameter and trimeter. This obeys the normal conventions of poetic ballad writing. However, the fourth line in each stanza is shortened slightly. This technique is used to slow down the poem, adding to the over-all melancholic feel of the ballad. It is a line cut too short, which reflects the love between the knight and the woman with the “wild wild eyes”. The deliberate interference of the form is a by-product of the ‘Romantic Period’ where poets rebelled against the obsession of order and strict form of the 18th Century. There is also an inclusion of idiom in this poem. When asked why he is so “woe-begone”, the knight is described as having a “lily on thy brow”. This idiom isn’t particularly a popular one, however, one interpretation can mean that the knight had death on his mind as lilies are often associated with death. The placement on the “brow” would represent what he would be pondering, and being so devastated, one would assume such thoughts of death are not too far a stretch when attempting to understand the idiom.
While John Keats’ ballad tells a tale, Amy Levy’s poem ‘A Ballade of Religion and Marriage’ instead conveys a moral message. Although not a story narrative, this poem still falls...

Other Essays On Poetic genre- conventions, techniques and idiom. - TCD- Literature - Essay

The Literary Genre of Rear Window, All My Sons and The Great Gatsby - 6th Grade - Essay

2178 words - 9 pages Literary Genre My three comparative texts are: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (code ‘G’), Rear Window by Alfred Hitchcock (code ‘R’) and All My Sons by Arthur Miller (code ‘S’) Respond to the Question here Literary genre is the style of writing and the ways in which an author makes use of their style to create their work. Whether it is technique, narrative, vocabulary, tone, context or length, these genres serve a purpose for the author

ethnic penalties and how they effect the lives of minorities - TCD - Essay

1750 words - 7 pages 6. Define the concept of ‘ethnic penalties’ and discuss the mechanisms that can lead ethnic minorities to be disadvantaged in schooling, employment and cultural life. Use specific examples or evidence to support your claims. “Institutionalized rejection of difference is an absolute necessity in a profit economy which needs outsiders as surplus people.” (Lorde, 1984: 115) This quote by black feminist scholar, Audre Lorde, very aptly surmises the

Children and Hope, Chinese Modern Literature - Chinese - Essay

1882 words - 8 pages In this essay I argue that the relevance of Traditional Chinese civil examinations in the forever evolving world deem impractical and inept. I will be using two stories as references to support my argument. “Horse-Bell Melons” and “Kong-Yiji” are two allegories written by Ye Shao Jun and Lu Xun, the leading intellectuals in China’s transition into modernity, through literature. Ye ShaoJun’s Horse-Bell Melon’s presented an insider’s perspective

Literary criticism of Blake and Wordworth - British Literature - Essay

2411 words - 10 pages through unique techniques and themes that center around the portrayal of children, women, and nature. These themes are used in several of both Blake and Wordsworth’s to express their views of time, love, and the sublime, areas of which are common among romantic literature. Blake and Wordsworth both used children as a source of symbolism for their beliefs about the nature of man. The portrayal of children allowed the authors to comment on the

McEwan and Plath’s Comparison Essay - Stockley Academy - English Literature A-Level - Essay

2968 words - 12 pages Shannon Kalinowska ‘On Chesil Beach’ and Sylvia Plath By comparing McEwan and Plath’s presentation of female characters how far can it be said that the women, in literature are often shown to conform to contemporary social conventions? In 1973, Wendy Martin writing in Women’s Studies noted that ‘male writers are permitted to articulate their aggression, however violent or hostile. Women writers are supposed to pretend they are never angry

Use film techniques to create setting and evoke mood in the film To Kill a Mockingbird - Grade 12 - Essay

959 words - 4 pages TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD ESSAY PLAN How does the director, Robert Mulligan, use film techniques to create setting and evoke mood in the film To Kill a Mockingbird? The director, Robert Mulligan, of the film To Kill a Mockingbird, uses film techniques such as the film being in black and white, thus creating an often uncomfortable setting. The monochromatic film allows the audience to see the divisions of segregation between the white and African

Representations and social criticism in Ibsen's a Doll's House - Literature - Essay

1312 words - 6 pages Task: Ibsen Take-home Essay Question 3: Literary texts often pose questions about an established social order. Discuss how representations have been constructed in A Doll’s House in order to critique, reinforce or destabilise social institutions and/or social expectations In the play A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen uses theatre as a means of voicing his own opinions on the imperfections of his society, posing question about the crippling effects

Romeo And Juliet - Film Techniques - English - Essay

1758 words - 8 pages Q: Compare the Baz Luhrmann and Shakespeare’s text types - themes/values (act 3 scene 1, act 1 scene 5, act 2 scene 2) A: Through a comparative study of Baz Luhrmann and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet we see that Shakespeare’s underlying values/themes are kindness, fear, love and betrayal and are kept and appropriated by Luhrmann for a modern context. Shakespeare wrote his plays for his Elizabethan crowd. He takes humanity's biggest flaws and

Othello Essay Analysis and Techniques - High School Essay - Essay

886 words - 4 pages English Othello Essay A lack of identity and connections to family and society creates barriers that restrict an individual’s true sense of belonging. Barriers can consist of an inability to be accepted for who and what you are or where a society can deny you an ability to develop a sense of self. Both the play "Othello" by William Shakespeare (1603) and the film "The Giver" directed by Phillip Noyce (2014), explore the concept of belonging

A Comparison of "Autumn Logging" and "All In A Day" - English 306, Literature of Work, Athabasca University - English Essay

770 words - 4 pages same way Warrior furthers his. “All in a Day” may not include many adjectives, but the frankness of Applebaum’s words lends itself well to the message and the overall tone. It is all meant to be taken at face value; what you see, or rather read, is what you get. Both works of literature employ similar literary techniques (and some different) in order to accurately portray the overall essence of the stories. Warrior’s “Autumn Logging” features

Discuss and analyse the importance of responsible business management using the academic literature and company examples to illustrate and support your arguments. - University of Kent - Essay

2410 words - 10 pages Alejandro Colmenares CB311 2017-2018 Discuss and analyse the importance of responsible business management using the academic literature and company examples to illustrate and support your arguments. Table of Contents: Introduction: 1 Body: 2 Conclusion: 4 Bibliography: 5 Introduction: Responsible business management according to Gildas Yombi an African social enterprise leader ‘means acting socially and thinking economically’ (Wegner 2017). I

Similar Papers

Romeo And Juliet Gender Conventions Fadf Essay

543 words - 3 pages Essay Question: In what way do Romeo and Juliet break gender conventions? How do these roles fluctuate throughout the play? In the play “Romeo and Juliet”, Shakespeare uses characters Romeo and Juliet to break gender conventions. During the Elizabethan period, men were expected to defend their honour while women were expected to be loyal to their family and were believed to be incapable of logical thinking. Romeo is obsessed with love and this

Narrative Conventions And Lesbian Desire University / English Lit Essay

2432 words - 10 pages One subversive way of encoding lesbian desire has been through undermining dominant textual narrative strategies. Compare how Cather, in My Antonia, and Stein, in The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, rework narrative conventions as a possible strategy to encode or reflect lesbian desire in their works. Both Cather and Stein are seen as authors who create a lesbian narrative space within their work. Marilyn Farwell argues that a lesbian

The Emotional Effect Of Poetic Structure On “Leda And The Swan” College English 105 Essay

674 words - 3 pages English 105.A01 4 November 2018 The Emotional Effect of Poetic Structure on “Leda and the Swan” The poem “Leda and the Swan” by W.B. Yeats is a poetic retelling of Zeus’s rape of Leda in Greek Mythology. According to the original myth, Zeus transformed himself physically into the form of a beautiful swan. As the swan, Zeus came to Leda and forced himself upon her, raping her. Poets make crucial choices every time they create a new work. They

The Wife Of Bath: Subtle Manipulation Techniques To Gain Sovereignty British Literature: Middle Ages Through 17th Century Essay

2369 words - 10 pages Grams 1 Mary Grams Professor Moore English G270 23 October 2018 Sovereignty? How About Total Control: The Wife of Bath’s Subtle Manipulation Techniques What is the role of a woman? The answer to that question has differed from generation to generation and culture to culture. Britain during the middle ages (5th century to the 15th century), was not the most comfortable place for most women. If anything, women held the positions of wife, mother