The Lost Pocket Paper

957 words - 4 pages

Mullin PAGE 1
Webb MullinMrs. NugentEnglish IISeptember 18, 2012Contents of a Dead Man's PocketJack Finney starts off the story with Tom Benecke sitting at a desk in the living room of his eleventh floor apartment, typing a memo for work. His wife Clare is preparing to go to the movies alone. With difficulty, Tom opens a stubborn window, and a gust of wind blows his paper out of the window onto a ledge. We see how Finney casually introduces that his apartment is on the eleventh floor of the building, in the great city of New York. Before you even begin reading the story, you get an eerie feeling just from the title of the short story. Then when you begin to read the story, and he introduces the setting and the 11th floor apartment so nonchalantly, you begin to get a feeling of suspense.Finney continues on with Tom seeing Clare off, and him explaining he must work rather than go with her, in the hopes of bettering himself at work. While the door to the apartment is open for Clare to leave, a current of air from the hallway enters the apartment. It blows a sheet of paper out the window, landing it on a ledge below, out of his reach. The paper contains all the data Tom needs for his memo proposing a new grocery-store display method. ]He reasons it would be simple to retrieve the sheet of paper from the ledge, compared to all the work he has put into it. At this point in the story, things begin to pick up, building the sense of suspense. Now that we know he is going to go out onto the ledge, we begin to start thinking not if he is going to die, but when he is going to die. As the pace of the book picks up we see that Finney uses the apartment and time of night to indicate suspense. He uses the time of day, which is night, to create suspense. As we all know, most scary stories happen at night!Finney then continues on with Tom putting on a jacket, exiting the window of his apartment. Edging along, he reaches the corner where the paper lies. He looks down at the street below, and starts to panic. He is frozen with fear. He shouts but no one hears him. He thinks of the worst, but gains enough strength to inch back to his apartment. We are now at the top the suspense ladder. He uses the traffic in the bustling city, and ledge of the New York City apartment building to create a sense of suspense and eeriness in this part of the story. We now are getting a better and better picture of how Finney uses the setting, including time and place, to create suspense.As Finney begins to reach the tippy top of the suspense ladder, he once again continues on with Tom reaching for the apartment window, as stumbles, causing the window to fall closed. He almost falls, then catches the window frame, and pulls himself against it. He can't open the window. He tries to break the glass with a coin, signal apartments across the street by setting fire to papers he finds in his pockets, drop coins onto the street below, but all of his attempts fail. He realizes if he falls, he has no i.d. The only thing to be found on his person will be the contents of his pockets: the page of data. He regrets the time he has spent away from his wife, working. His life seems wasted. As a last effort, he decides to punch his way through the window. He is successful. Upon reentering his apartment, he immediately lays the retrieved paper on his desk. As he leaves to join his wife at the movies, he sees that same piece of paper fly out the window again. So as Finney reaches the climax, he uses his surroundings like different apartments and people below to create a sense of suspsense. He creates that suspense by using them as a something/someone that could possibly save Tom. Although, it turns out that Tom is given a second chance by the almighty supernatural power that is controlling the paper and actions in this story. Tom ends up saving himself, and learns a very valuable lesson from this terrifying, life changing event.So to recap everything in this Analysis, The suspense in "Contents of the Dead Man's Pockets" is created in multiple ways. First, the title itself, when referring to a dead man, sets the reader up to assume the death of the main character Tom Benecke. So, when we read that he is home alone at night when he sees his needed paper fly out the window above "the muffled street traffic far below," we feel we know what will eventually happen. It is this feeling of what we, the readers, believe to be certain that helps create the suspense within the story. Also, the writer uses repetitions, such as "right foot, left foot, right foot..." The way Finney spreads out the outstanding details of a very small period of time puts the reader "in the moment" feeling every scrape of the brick, every gust of wind, and the feeling of imminent danger of his fall. This anxiety is part of suspense.

RELATED

Our Documents Paper. List The Merits Of Obamacare For Individuals, Families And Small Businesses

1280 words - 6 pages health insurance company decision, the right to get an easy-to-understand summary about a health plan's benefits and coverage, Young Adults can stay on their parent's plan until 26, large improvements to women's health service, reforms to the healthcare industry to cut wasteful spending, better care and protections for seniors, preventative Services at no-out-of pocket costs, essential health benefits like emergency care, hospitalization

Original Writing: A Soldiers Tale …

2517 words - 11 pages going to be fine but we need to move quickly.` - Rob said in calmer voice. My legs refused to walk but I forced myself, for my family, especialy the kids, they need a father all in one piece. So we walked, crawled for ages soldiers too bunged up to consider where they are going. Many of us lost our boots and have cuts on our feet but we need to go on. There is no way back. Disoriented I followed Rob and the others. Suddenly we stopped; the

A Criticism of Modern Etiquette - AP Language and Composition - Essay

555 words - 3 pages In Class Argumentative In developed nations such as the United States, polite phrases and etiquette such as “Nice to meet you” or “How are you?” are friendly and useful for small talk, but they are completely empty of true meaning and goodwill due to centuries of repetition, and should be avoided as they are a waste of words and breath if a person does not truly mean it. Common phrases such as “please” and “thank you” have lost their meaning

Relicta, a story written in summer school - May wood - Story writing

1025 words - 5 pages took it out from his pocket and started  biting it. I glared at him, reminding him to suck on it. “S-sorry”  He replied apologetically as he sucked on it. I sighed and walked to  the pond to wash my face.   I looked at it to see my reflection. I Have blue eyes, not as  deep as Melvin’s, and my hair is always messy. I also have a scar  on my left cheek I got while chasing a frog through the forest. I  tripped on a rock and fell on a sharp rock that

The Deaf Girl Who Lived in the Woods - Roselle Park High School - Short Story

1486 words - 6 pages , “Don’t see any flames from here anyway.” “Not yet” Closing the door behind her, Jess walks out of her house, approaching Becca. Becca slips her phone into her pocket. In sign language, Becca expresses how much she loved the book Jess wrote about. “You don’t need to talk in sign language.” “I know you can read lips, but I’m getting better at sign.”                 “I…uh. want to practice” “What did you think of the book in sign Jess responds

Essay On The Sure Cure For Insomnia

1140 words - 5 pages First Sergeant introduced the speaker, and it quickly went downhill from there; she lost us at hello. The topic forced air from everyone's lungs in the form if an elongated sigh which echoed through the auditorium like the last breath of a dying man. We knew we were down for the count; some began writing their last will and testament while others succumbed to the inevitable and leaned forward in their seats to lessen the fall when they fell

George Lucas - What Themes Does He Deal With?, What Influence Has His Personal Life Had On His Work? And What Is The Significance Of His Work In Today's Society?

1319 words - 6 pages George Lucas is one of the most well known people in the world. He is the man who created the Star Wars saga and Indiana Jones trilogy. From blasting into space past planets and galaxies, to going through the desert to find the lost arc, George Lucas has captured millions of people's imaginations across the world. I have chosen to study George Lucas because I am one of those millions of people whose imagination has been captured by his work. The

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian - Campbell, English - Assignment

830 words - 4 pages surprising and disastrous deaths that directly influence Junior. To begin with, his grandmother is hit by a vehicle and killed. Then, his father's best friend is murdered. Then, his sister dies in a fire. Junior experiences each of these losses, and grieves, he goes through a period where he is emotionally lost himself. Death, racial prejudice and discrimination all lead to the loss of Junior’s childhood innocence. Yet, every one of the outcomes

whether we should ban the cigarettes or not - MLC - cigarettes

959 words - 4 pages 29 percent of poor adults smoke, compared to 18 percent of non-poor adults. They are sensitive to the price of the cigarettes since the expensive tobacco means they have to choose between the cigarettes, the thing you choose to have or the bread, the thing you have to have. The low-income people are not the only group of smokers that worries about the prices, the teenager smokers have limited pocket money as well. Existing research indicates

Prohibition Essay NCEA Level 3 History - ncea level 3 - history analysis

1804 words - 8 pages opportunity for bootlegging, smuggling via pharmacies or speakeasies and manufacture alcohol to ordinary citizens and gangsters alike. Prohibition was an opportunity to make millions and there was a rise of organized crime. Al Capone made $60 million annually just through alcohol. This significant wealth allowed Al Capone to gain power to a level where he had police, judges and senators in his pocket and once these civil servants were in the

Racism In Film

1053 words - 5 pages Nazi leads to the death of one who he loves the most. Racism takes life of Derek?s father and his young brother. His young brother was starting to go on the same track as him, which he never wanted to happened. Racism makes Derek a more violent person than what he was before his father died. Racism also breaks his family apart and in a way prevented his mother from being happy. She stop being mother to his children as she lost control over his

Chapter 25 homework accounting II - Hunter College - assignment

714 words - 3 pages reduces both taxable income and taxes paid in the short run (in the long run there is no difference except for the time value of money). Therefore, net cash inflows will be larger in earlier years, which will increase the present value of future cash flows. 11. An out-of-pocket cost requires a current outlay of cash. An opportunity cost is the potential benefit that is lost by choosing an alternative course of action. Opportunity costs are

George Washington: Great Military Hero

1355 words - 6 pages against the determined Americans but it was useless and they were forced to retreat. This battle showed how far George Washington would go to defeat the British army. This plan was most likely predicted to fail but George Washington pulled out and pulled out with only two casualties. On the other hand "the Hessians had 23 dead, 92 wounded, 913 captured." The Hessians lost so terribly because George Washington was fully prepared for the battle by

Definition of what it means to be an American - English - Essay

763 words - 4 pages Yee-HAW! A cowboy rides off in the sunset. Alan Jackson's masterpiece "Chattahoochee" begins to play, softly yet surely. The cowboy pulls a blade and begins to shave, he scraps through his back right pocket, pulls his Mail Pouch and packs a hog-nut. The sun beats down on the barren Wild West. An excruciating day of herding longhorns, the cowboy reaches for a flask and takes a swig of his last few drops of Jameson Whiskey. He dismounts himself

The Role of Wealth in the Hobbit - Gilson College Year 9 - Essay/Text Response

1308 words - 6 pages driven by greed and a longing for their lost treasure. The story consists of thirteen dwarves accompanied by a wizard and a hobbit who set out onto a dangerous expedition to claim back their lost treasure, which was stolen from a gluttonous, gold-loving dragon by the name of Smaug. As quoted by Seneca, a Roman Stoic philosopher; “It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.” In The Hobbit, wealth is a principal