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The Main Idea Of The Poem "Aubade" By Philip Larkin

461 words - 2 pages

What actually is death? Is it leaving this world and starting a new beginning or is it just the end of everything. Phillip Larkins poem "Aubade" expresses the thoughts and questions of a person who is scared of dying. He makes the person question their self, but then finally realizes that death is a part of life and the person has to accept it and look at is as a new beginning. So Larkins main idea that he tries to get across to his readers is that death is a new beginning and although we are scared of it, we ...view middle of the document...

Larkin gives the idea that being afraid of death is a different kind of fear. Death is so far away from us, but we know its there and it brings these chills to you every time we think of it. While in this world, we have so many things that try to make us believe that we never do really die. The world actually tries to take that fear from us. "Religion use to try/ that vast moth-eaten musical brocade/ created to pretend we never die."(Lines 22-24). You can't trick your mind with death because it will always be there no matter what.Another great point that Larkin discusses in his poem is that no one can escape death. Even if you are this all mighty brave human, you still experience death. "Being brave/ Lets no one off the grave."(Lines 38-39). So we as humans shouldn't try to be brave in front of death because its going to get you no matter what.Even though death is so hard to understand and accept, it's really the big meaning of life. Without death, we would live in eternal sin and never be able to experience that everlasting life that death brings. So look at death and accept it as a good thing rather then a bad thing.

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