World War I Essay

1413 words - 6 pages

The First World War was a global war that was centered about Europe from 1914-1919. The war was a senseless slaughter of over nine million combative and civilian deaths that no nation benefited from. Rather than the war being fought between Austria-Hungary and Serbia, the instigators of the entire war, their allies took command of the war and caused it to escalate into global catastrophic destruction between some of earth's most prominent superpowers.Many different tensions plagued Europe even before any sort of trigger event occurred. Europe was already cautious of Germany once its Kaiser, Friedrich Wilhelm II, increased the size of his nation's army. He had a fascination with the British ...view middle of the document...

Both Germany, being an ally to Austria, and Russia, being and ally to Serbia, promptly joined the war. Germany had then quickly declared war on Russia and its ally France. In the meantime, Great Britain was debating on lending assistance to its ally, France. Once Germany brutally invaded Belgium, Britain quickly took action and declared war on Germany. It would be the first time in almost one hundred years since all the major super powers fought against each other which had not happened since Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo. At that time several nations; England, France, Germany, Prussia, and Russia; had partaken in battle against one another. However, this time was different. Europe was now divided into two main separate powers, the Allied Powers and the Central Powers.Europe since pre-Roman times has been marked by conflict. Warring tribes often did battle in small skirmishes and hand-to-hand combat. But as the civilizations grew and technology improved the battles became larger and much more intense. With the Industrial revolution, warfare would change forever. This can be best seen during World War I as many new and horrible inventions were brought into existence. Weapons such as machine guns had not been explored before, yet were now used in trench warfare and mounted on speeding planes. The invention of the machine gun also allowed many civilians to fight and protect themselves, becoming capable of killing many enemy soldiers. Industrialization of the warring countries meant a better railroad system. In turn, this meant that moving the supplies of war to the front line could be done relatively easily. Zeppelins, submarines, and tanks were also added to the mix. Germany used zeppelins to bomb England and U-boats to block and sink supply ships. A final difference from this war from any other was the use of science. It was during this time when science was looked upon to help break the stalemate of the war. This can be seen in the use of toxic gas. The Germans looked for ways to gain the advantage, and their scientists developed a way to spread Chlorine and mustard gas over the unprepared allies.When war did break out in June, 1914, the belligerents had a high enthusiasm toward the war. Men lined up at recruiting offices and volunteered to fight. The past couple of wars had only lasted a few months at the most. Poetry written during the beginning of the war possesses a romantic flavor and writers compared the duty of serving in the army as the right thing to do and that dying for your country is the best possible way to die. Because of this sense of honor and pride, soldiers thought war was a noble thing to do and they were excited to fight on the battlefield. However the disillusionment of these millions upon millions of young men are slammed to a stop as the glory they fight for comes not, but are instead greeted by great death and destruction. As the days passed by the bodycount began to...

Other Essays On World War I

Post World War I Novel. Short Biography On Virginia Woolf And Book Report On Her Work "Mrs. Dalloway"

1027 words - 5 pages Post World War I Novel"Mrs. Dalloway" by Virginia WoolfThe ending of World War I in Europe left England in a state of physical and political upheaval. Being the arena for Europe's war, England's physical destruction could be seen everywhere. However, England was also undergoing political and emotional turmoil. In addition to England's loss of political clout with its colonies, women's rights were also being fought out in the public domain

Comparative of How British and German Soldiers Were Viewed in Society Post World War I: Physical and Psychological Traumas - Lawrence Academy, History - War & Gender

2286 words - 10 pages 1 Kayla Hussey Professor Rodriguez War and Gender 12/8/16 Comparative of How British and German Soldiers Were Viewed in Society Post World War I: Physical and Psychological Traumas While the governments of each country were figuring out how to come back from World War One peacefully, returning soldiers were dealing with the traumas endured during their time at the war front. Wilfred Owens, a poet of World War One, writes, “My friend, you would

Stalingrad: The Battle And How I Believe It Was The MOST Important Battle Of World War II

1569 words - 7 pages Stalingrad: The Most Crucial Battle of World War IIWorld War II was the bloodiest war ever fought in the history of the world. Countless men lost their lives and countries were almost obliterated. One could only imagine what would have become of the human race had the Nazi war machine defeated all of Europe and then made its way into America. While Germany was expanding its territory all over Europe, they made it as far as Russia, and a battle

Cold War

491 words - 2 pages everyone I knew would be gone forever. Living in a nuclear war would mean to never know when the end of life could be or when the end of a loved one's life could be. We would be all living in the world of fear and the world of the unknown.Living in a nuclear war can be very similar to terrorism or it can be also very different depending on the way it is looked upon. Some of the similarities of terrorism and nuclear war are that both of these can take

resaerch on great britain during ww1 - southern alamance high school world history - research paper

605 words - 3 pages credited by some with drawing women into mainstream employment for the first time.  Debates continue about the impact the war had on women's emancipation, given that a large number of women were granted the vote for the first time in 1918.  Works Cited 1)Article Title- World War 1 https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/world-war-i-history Website Title- History.com 2)Article Title- Facts about World War 1 https://www.historyextra.com/period

The Cold War In a Global Porspective - History - Research

1257 words - 6 pages fanatics certain that their authoritarian values would eventually rule the world, we prevailed in time…’ In consideration to Theodore’s statement which suggests the globalization of the Cold War had already begun by the late 1940s, we can assess globalization era of the cold war and explore aspects which pursue Theodore’s perception. However, I must agree to a certain extent that the statement bears much reliability acknowledging the fact that

The factors that contributed to the commencement of hostilities in 1939 - 10 Rory harris - Essay

607 words - 3 pages The factors that contributed to the commencement of hostilities in 1939 OVERARCHING REASON FOR THE COMMENCEMENT OF HOSTILITIES WAS HITLER’S RISE TO POWER WHAT LED TO HITLER BECOMING SO POPULAR? GERMAN PEOPLE DISILLUSIONED AND ANGRY AT THEIR TREATMENT AFTER WORLD WAR 1 Intro – world war I was once considered the war to end all wars, this theory was soon over come in 1939 when the commencement of world war II begun. The Versailles treaty was the

World History

2214 words - 9 pages after the defeat of Napoleon in 1815;• Growing popular nationalism in Europe; industrialization and industrialized militarism; and competition among European powers for colonial empires also played a significant role.2. In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?• The needs of total war led to the expansion of government authority.• The destruction of life and property wrought by the war

What role did Christianity play in the mental health of the active soldiers during World War II? - History of the Americas - Research Paper

576 words - 3 pages 4 IB History HL Internal Assessment What role did Christianity play in the mental health of the active soldiers during World War II? Section 1: Identification and Evaluation of sources This investigation will explore the question: What role did Christianity play in the mental health of the active soldiers during World War II? The dates 1939 to 1945 will be the centralized time period in which the investigation occurs. This allows an in-depth

rogers world history 1 wwii essay - world history 1 - essay

707 words - 3 pages Declaration of the United Nations was signed by the 26 Allied nations on the first day of 1942. Also in 1942, mass murder began happening at Auschwitz. The third cause of world war II was the rise of Fascism. Fascism was a movement that began before world war I, but did not become a serious political power until Benito Mussolini took control of the Italian government in 1922. Under Mussolini Italy became a Totalitarian government where labor unions

Ww1

564 words - 3 pages World War 1World War 1 was called "The Great War", "The war to end all wars", and "The first modern war". It had many causes and a few repercussions and I will describe them in detail.The most widely known reason for the start of World War1 was the assassination of the Arch Duke Ferdinad of Austria-Hungary in the Serbian capital of Sarajevo. The ArchDuke was there to talk to the Serbian leaders about peace in the Balkan Peninsula.After a Serbian

Similar Papers

Three Main Causes Of World War I

1019 words - 5 pages While we are always reminded of the negative effects of war, it is not everyday that we learn to understand the deeper factors of war that can turn a small conflict into an international outbreak. World War I was said to have been sparked by the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand but there are various deeper reasons that contributed to the commencement of the Great War. These factors include militarism, imperialism and the alliance

American Involvement In World War I

2135 words - 9 pages American involvement in World War I was not primarily the result of American bankers protecting their wartime loans and profits, but rather the need to safeguard democracy after the major events in Europe, the United States' failure to remain a neutral country and the conflicting problems between the United States and numerous European countries leading up to the war.There were many causes of World War I. The first cause was the Alliance System

History Exam Essay Based On World War I History 2020 Modern American History Essay

1184 words - 5 pages entered the war. I think that there were many elements that led to the U.S. entering World War One. Although the Zimmerman Telegram and sinking the Lusitania played major roles, those were both caused by Germany, not directly by U.S. actions. One of the major U.S. actions that, I think, caused them to enter the war was the continuous economic interests with countries that were involved in the war. There were American businessmen that became involved in

Spanish American War And World War I

498 words - 2 pages war with Spain. If it weren't for the newspaper article no one in America would fight Spain to help Cuba receive independence. By America getting what they wanted after the Spanish-American War it represent the achievement of a second phase of manifest destiny. Since manifest destiny is when one country rules the whole world the second phase was when one country has full control of one hemisphere and that's what exactly America did. America