Summary Of "A Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley

1294 words - 6 pages

Huxley's point of view in Brave New World is third person, omniscient (all-knowing). The narrator is not one of the characters and therefore has the ability to tell us what is going on within any of the characters' minds. This ability is particularly useful in showing us a cross section of this strange society of the future. We can be with the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning in the Central London Conditioning and Hatchery Centre, with Lenina Crowne at the Westminster Abbey Cabaret, with Bernard Marx at the Fordson Community Singery. An extreem example of the technique would be in Chapter Three, when we hear a babble of unidentified voices--Lenina's, Fanny Crowne's, Mustapha ...view middle of the document...

The Controller, one of the ten men who run the world, explains some of the more profound principles on which the Utopia is based. One is that 'history is bunk'; the society limits people's knowledge of the past so they will not be able to compare the present with anything that might make them want to change the present. Another principle is that people should have no emotions, particularly no painful emotions; blind happiness is necessary for stability. One of the things that guarantees happiness is a drug called soma, which calms you down and gets you high but never gives you a hangover. Another is the 'feelies,' movies that reach your sense of touch as well as your sight and hearing.After Huxley presents these themes in the first three chapters, the story begins. Bernard Marx, an Alpha of the top class, is on the verge of falling in love with Lenina Crowne, a woman who works in the Embryo Room of the Hatchery. Lenina has been dating Henry Foster, a Hatchery scientist; her friend Fanny nags her because she hasn't seen any other man for four months. Lenina likes Bernard but doesn't fall in love with him. Falling in love is a sin in this world in which one has sex with everyone else, and she is a happy, conforming citizen of the Utopia.Bernard is neither happy nor conforming. He's a bit odd; for one thing, he's small for an Alpha, in a world where every member of the same caste is alike. He likes to treasure his differences from his fellows, but he lacks the courage to fight for his right to be an individual. In contrast is his friend Helmholtz Watson, successful in sports, sex, and community activities, but openly dissatisfied because instead of writing something beautiful and powerful, his job is to turn out propaganda.Bernard attends a solidarity service of the Fordian religion. It culminates in a sexual orgy, but he doesn't feel the true rapture experienced by the other 11 members of his group.Bernard then takes Lenina to visit a Savage Reservation in North America. While signing his permit to go, the Director tells Bernard how he visited the same Reservation as a young man, taking a young woman from London who disappeared and was presumed dead. He then threatens Bernard with exile to Iceland because Bernard is a nonconformist: he doesn't gobble up pleasure in his leisure time like an infant.At the Reservation, Bernard and Lenina meet John, a handsome young Savage who, Bernard soon realizes, is the son of the Director. Clearly, the woman the Director had taken to the Reservation long ago had...

Other Essays On Summary Of "A Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley

Brave New World: Not exactly brave - Honors requirement - Essay over Brave New World

1849 words - 8 pages Running head: NOT EXACTLY BRAVE Not Exactly Brave Not Exactly Brave In Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, a dystopian society is portrayed in which everything we view as correct and moral, society views as wrong, immoral, and absurd. The novel is written in the early 1930s, a decade after the roaring 1920s in which many political, social, and scientific advances took place (History, 2010). A major controversy of the decade involved science and

brave new world: character analysis - eng - Essay

1117 words - 5 pages allows you to grow, to experience true joy, love, and relationships. In Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley, characterization and theme lead you to a deeper understanding of a manufactured world where everyone puts on a mask and teaches you to never sacrifice true emotions for artificial ones. Henry Foster is one of Lenina’s many lovers. “He expects nice girls to sleep around just as he does” (Mitcham 1). He is a perfectly conventional Alpha male

Comparative Essay of Brave New World and Gattaca - High School English - Essay

2735 words - 11 pages Brave New World and Gattaca Comparative Essay Both the movie Gattaca and the novel, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley have similar themes; lack of, or too much independence and identity, the comparison of the characters Bernard and Vincent as well as three themes which will be elaborated in this essay. Gattaca has created strong arguments to if they are too independent and some how use it against them. In Brave New World however, it appears they

Brave New World Representation and Meaning - Year 12 - Essay

1478 words - 6 pages language devices, Huxley, in his novel Brave New World, is effectively able to present his own political beliefs by contrasting two extreme political structures. This allows him to comment on the role of technology in societal development, the cost of individuality for stability, and then ask us to choose between the two political ideas. Through his criticism of both, however, he calls upon his readers to re-evaluate their current political

Brave New World Representation and Meaning - Year 12 - Essay

1478 words - 6 pages language devices, Huxley, in his novel Brave New World, is effectively able to present his own political beliefs by contrasting two extreme political structures. This allows him to comment on the role of technology in societal development, the cost of individuality for stability, and then ask us to choose between the two political ideas. Through his criticism of both, however, he calls upon his readers to re-evaluate their current political

brave new world, change in character - 13 grade - essay

1883 words - 8 pages ENOCK MGENDI English essay Brave New World: It is the way the character changes in a text that makes it worth reading. Intro · Often, the development and progression of a character are how readers can sympathise with a character or develop an intense emotional experience. · Aldous Huxley's riveting novel, Brave New World depicts a futuristic, utopian society in which characters are oppressed and forced to love their pre-natal intelligence

brave new world, change in character - 13 grade - essay

1883 words - 8 pages ENOCK MGENDI English essay Brave New World: It is the way the character changes in a text that makes it worth reading. Intro · Often, the development and progression of a character are how readers can sympathise with a character or develop an intense emotional experience. · Aldous Huxley's riveting novel, Brave New World depicts a futuristic, utopian society in which characters are oppressed and forced to love their pre-natal intelligence

brave new world, change in character - 13 grade - essay

1883 words - 8 pages ENOCK MGENDI English essay Brave New World: It is the way the character changes in a text that makes it worth reading. Intro · Often, the development and progression of a character are how readers can sympathise with a character or develop an intense emotional experience. · Aldous Huxley's riveting novel, Brave New World depicts a futuristic, utopian society in which characters are oppressed and forced to love their pre-natal intelligence

Essay outline for brave new world - CCI - Essay

2523 words - 11 pages ) Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World started as a parody of utopian fiction, and projected into the year 2540 industrial and social changes he perceived in 1931, leading to industrial success by a coercively persuaded population divided into five castes; Proof in Brave New World 1. The World State is an enormous system of production and consumption in which humans are turned into machines for further production and consumption. The world “allows

Summary Paper of Talkin Black in a White Man's world by Sami H Alim - english 102 - essay

482 words - 2 pages ENGL 102-AS21 29 September 2017 ENGL 102-AS21 29 September 2017 Summary of “Talkin Black in a White Man’s World” by Samy H. Alim In the chapter, “Talkin Black in this White Man’s World,” from Samy H. Alim’s scholarly monograph Roc the Mic Right, Alim argues for “linguistic equanimity- the structural and social equality of languages-”(51) and how racial tensions and linguistic supremacy currently exist between Black Language (BL) and White

She's with Me by jessica Cunsolo - Write a summaru on a story of your choice - Summary

455 words - 2 pages In the stories The Cask of the Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe and The Interlopers by Saki both share a common theme and conflict. The theme that both stories share “blood will have blood” or, in other words revenge. The shared conflict is man vs. man, which each story illustrates in different ways. In The Cask of Amontillado the theme is stated in the very first paragraph. The main character Montresor seeks revenge on Fortunato “The thousand

Similar Papers

A Brave New World Essay

956 words - 4 pages A brave new world by Aldous Huxley 1) This is a futuristic social novel. It describes the economy 600 years from now.Before I go any further I would like to explain the way of life in that period. Humans are bred and conditioned by scientific methods to create a society in which people have peaceful, responsibly happy lives but no individual freedom or opportunity for passion. The human race is separated in 5 different classes: the

Brave New World Essay

1346 words - 6 pages can see from the plot summary of Brave New World Aldous Huxley was very against a Utopian state. He is perhaps warning future generations that if they dream of perfecting society, especially through technology they run the risk of destroying everything that is beautiful about life. He vividly explains that such a place would destroy culture, as we know it, for all books threatening the state would be band and all art and knowledge except science

Brave New World 3 Essay

1310 words - 6 pages Brave New World: "Oh, my God, my God!" In 1932, Aldous Huxley first published the novel, Brave New World. During this time, the ideas that Huxley explored in his novel were not a reality, but merely science-fiction entertainment. Brave New World confronts ideas of totalitarianism, artificial reproduction, anti-individualism, and forever youth- ideas which were not threatening in the 30's. In the 1930's, the high ethical standards people

Satire Based On A Conditioning, In Brave New World

613 words - 3 pages like she should lie down again and take a nap. The state hopes that she does not wake up. Another victim of a 'New and Improved Health Care Plan.' This may sound insane to you. Of course, the government will protect you when you are old. However, is your state really as far of from this as you would like to think?