Paper On Frederick Douglass

1001 words - 5 pages

Response to the Narrative of the Life of Frederick DouglassA flashlight pierces through the darkness as the resonance of hundreds of timid footsteps echo through the spacious valley. The footsteps come to a gradual halt while the leader of the group hastily pulls out a piece of paper and studies it thoughtfully. Not a single noise can be heard as Juhi studies his map, antiquated and discolored from overuse. Except for the weak luminescence from the flashlight, the entire valley is completely dark. Juhi quickly wipes the trickling sweat off his forehead in a thinly veiled effort to disguise his nervousness. Being the only educated person here, all of these people have faith in me and it is ...view middle of the document...

However, some of these life-changing experiences are indeed dreadful and dangerous. I disagree with Douglass's opinion because being ignorant and blissful is more detrimental than being educated and somber, because solving a problem you are educated about is easier than solving a problem that you don't even know exists, and because educating yourself opens up opportunities while remaining uneducated can actually be dangerous.Many parents of this generation would agree that "ignorance is bliss". As children now have more and more ways to educate themselves and learn about the horrors of the real world, many parents wish that their children could be children again; not knowing anything about the real world and living in blissful ignorance. I would partially agree with Douglass on that part. Imagining yourself in a perfect world with zero problems does sound appealing, but at a point in life, everyone has to face reality. For example, I grew up thinking that couples who married never split up; I didn't even know what divorce was. I ended up learning about divorce the hard way in an incident which involved one of my aunts leaving a wedding in tears. If I had been educated about divorce earlier, I wouldn't have felt too bad about the implication. Just like in Douglass's case, if he never accepted the harsh truth about slavery, he would've never been able to escape it.Most people think that slavery is a thing of the past, which is not true at all; there are more slaves on Earth right now than when slavery was legal. Before the End it Movement, I was one of these people and I was shocked when I found out that 27 million people were still in slavery. Before I was truly educated about human trafficking...

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