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Women Of The Nazi Movement Essay

2535 words - 11 pages

Women of the Nazi Movement There were many groups of people affected by the Nazi movement, but women were in fact a very important group that is often left out. Women played a momentous role in the Nazi movement. Unlike other groups, they acknowledged their role in the movement and realized that Nazi Germany was a male leading public division in terms of establishing policies and making decisions or taking leadership, because for the most part, the history of Germany was always male domineering. Women were evidently silent and not present in public events. The Nazis regarded women as having a divided realm and an undisclosed area outside the civic role. The Nazis wanted to prohibit women ...view middle of the document...

Women had a fundamental role to play as mothers because they were accountable for keeping the Aryan race pure. Women were kept out of leadership and political roles and expected to fulfill more natural roles of wife and mother. This allowed women to carry out and uphold the essential role of mother and wife, which promoted the Nazi's view of keeping society conservative and natural. They were to stay home, instead of working, and apply their "intuition and sacrifice for the sake of nurturing others", (Spielvogel, p 176). Education was of no need to women in Nazi Society, however, they were expected to have household knowledge.When Germany was ruled under the Weimar Republic, women were given the privilege to vote along with equal rights. However, the laws were never approved. So essentially, women's rights were short lived and when the Nazis won power over the Weimar Republic, the Civil Code was back in power, which required women to return into subsidiary roles.When the Nazis successfully acquired political domination over Germany, all social organizations were either stringently observed by the Nazis or isolated altogether. Moreover, all women's organizations "whether political, social, professional, charitable, or religious", (Speilvogel, p 177) were edited to enforce Nazi standards and altered to benefit the male leaders of the NSDAP. In 1933, after the Nazi seizure of power, a new national organization for women was produced, and included all women organizations within it. A female leader would be chosen to run the organization, however she would have absolutely no political leadership rights in the decision making of the group. Gertrud Scholtz - Klink was the woman of preference to regulate the new organization, which was called the German Women's Bureau. She was the ideal representation of an Aryan woman. She had blonde hair, blue eyes, and four children. The Women's Bureau created a "Reich Mother's Service", which provided instruction and welfare for mothers. Instructions included house care and management, sewing, childcare and nutrition. Of course, it was concentrated on Nazi philosophy and taught women to support the Third Reich. The women held charities to raise money and volunteered in different fundraisers that would be utilized as relief funds. Ultimately, the relief funds would help 20% of the population who were on welfare. There was also another women's group, although before Nazi seizure, this group was an elite group involved in campaigning. After the Nazis gained control, this group (National Socialist Women's Association, a.k.a. NSF) would function "to direct the affairs of German women", (Speilvogel, p 178). They provided the "cultural, spiritual and political education of German women", (Speilvogel, p 178). They also were overseer to and preserved control over the German Women's Bureau.Under the Weimar Republic, women had been employed in many fields of work. These included jobs such as supporting aids, and deskwork as...

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