Polio Vaccines Essay

1017 words - 5 pages

There are two polio vaccines that are used throughout the world today. There is the oral polio vaccine and the injected polio vaccine. The injection vaccine was invented first. It was invented by Jonas Salk and first tested in 1952. It was announced to the world on April 12, 1955. The second vaccine was invented by Albert Sabin. This vaccine was the oral one. The oral vaccine was a scientific breakthrough at that time. The vaccine was began testing in 1957 and was introduced to the world in 1962.The Oral Polio Vaccine was much more fit for the younger polio victims. Most polio victims were young children but most complication with polio was with the older people who had polio. Babies and ...view middle of the document...

But an accurate study of Polio was accepted only in the 1930s when science gave the power to scientists to trace the disease in all of Brodie's vaccine was unsuccessful, and Kholer's achieved notoriety as the suspected cause of several cases of Polio. Polio was one of the most feared diseases in the 20th century.The first Polio vaccine invented was the Injected Polio Vaccine or IPV. The Injected Polio Vaccine was invented by Dr. Jonas Salk. By 1954 The United States began using his vaccine on children and the rate of children having Polio dramatically decreased. Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine was a major science breakthrough at that time. His vaccine would be soon replaced by a better version invented by Dr. Albert Sabin, the Oral Polio Vaccine.The second vaccine was the Oral Polio Vaccine or OPV invented by Dr. Albert Sabin. This was the better vaccine in many people's eyes. The Oral Polio Vaccine was better for small children because it was not a big needle. Even though the Oral Polio Vaccine was invented and was better than the Injected Polio Vaccine, parents still have an option to choose which vaccine and schedule they want for their child. Most parents choose the Oral Polio Vaccine. They choose it because the injected vaccine is usually too big for young children and hurts. Most children during the 1950s had no choice but to take the injected vaccine. There may not be many cases of Polio in The United States but in other parts of the world such as Africa they still use the Polio vaccines.Polio was one of the most feared diseases in the 20th century. The connection between the neurological symptoms of Polio and the more typical...

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